Authenticating trusted messages with Exchange and Office 365

One of the rather interesting side effects of moving your mailbox to Exchange Online is the change in behavior of the old trusty Safe Sender list. If if your mail client trusts only messages sent from a safe sender, all other messages will end up in junk mail. This is change from on-premises – where only messages marked as junk will be marked as SPAM. All others – including the trusted senders- will arrive in the inbox.

For the most part, this is not a big deal, simply inform your end-users of this change once their mailbox has been migrated and let them decide how to handle it; Keep using Safe Senders and whitelist any legitimate senders, or disable it and use the standard junk mail settings in the client.

There are specific scenarios where this could be problematic however. Many organizations have developed internal processes that send reports, alerts and updates anonymously from on-premises systems to their workforce. It’s very common to have dozens to hundreds of these processes, enabled over many years – each sending as an arbitrary SMTP address – essentially spoofing as an authoritative domain.  And it’s not as easy as it sounds to ask end-users – especially executives (who rely heavily on the Safe Sender option) to whitelist numerous addresses when it wasn’t required in the past.

Ah, the solution is easy. Just add your authoritative domain to Safe Senders. That will cover you for everything. Not so fast!

One, you can’t add an authoritative domain to the trusted list.

Two, Exchange Online doesn’t honor white-listed domains anyway.

One possible solution that is the least disruptive to the end-user: Trust those internal processes at the Exchange server level.

Example: Assume you are in hybrid mode and still have an Exchange Server on-prem. Create a receive connector on the Exchange Server. Scope the remote IP addresses to the internal SMTP servers that send these messages to end-users, then check the box ( or use powershell) to set the receive connector you just created as “Externally Secure”.

The receive connector auth and permissions will now look like this:

AuthMechanism           : Tls, ExternalAuthoritative
PermissionGroups        : AnonymousUsers, ExchangeServers

What you see in the headers of a received message:

X-MS-Exchange-Organization-AuthAs: Internal

X-MS-Exchange-Organization-AuthMechanism: 10

In the end, all messages that pass through this connector ( and eventually through the hybrid connector to Office 365) will be considered authenticated and will not be sent to junk mail – even if the sender is not in the Safe Sender List. Boom!

P.S. This is only an example. Do not enable this option if you do not trust or have control of the sending servers.

Published by adavid6

Grumpy Old Exchange MVP. My old site was lost: https://web.archive.org/web/20180307110652/http://no-one-uses-email-anymore.com/ I have been an Exchange MVP since 2002. I also had the honor of naming “You had me at EHLO” for the Exchange Product Group Blog way back in the early 2000s. I attempt to answer forum questions on TechNet: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/profile/andy%20david/ and can be found on Twitter: https://twitter.com/adavid6 Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/adavid1608 Microsoft Tech Community: https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/user/viewprofilepage/user-id/86

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